Skellingthorpe

Description

Use the open/close headers to view different sections of the Character Area Statement. for the area you are in. A full copy of the statement can be downlaoded from the 'Documents'  section of each Character Area.

  • Overview
    Skellingthorpe is a suburban mainly residential Character Area with some shops, churches and schools. The majority of the current townscape dates from the Inter-War Period although earlier medieval and later, including 19th-century, townscape and landscape elements still have a strong influence on the character. There are large urban blocks with very limited pedestrian permeability. The sense of enclosure along Moorland Avenue with its wide streets and deep setbacks is low although elsewhere in the Character Area the narrower streets give a much stronger sense of enclosure for a suburb. Housing in the Character Area is mainly two storeys high and built in red brick. Some buildings show the influence of the Arts and Crafts style with hipped roofs with deep eaves, tall chimneys and bay windows; this can also be seen in the neighbouring Moorland Character Area.
     
    Holy Cross Church and St. Peter and St. Paul Church on Skellingthorpe Road are both landmark buildings. There is an area of vitality around the shops on Boultham Park Road roundabout and the intersection here of four of the roads which form part of the main vehicle transport network in south Lincoln gives the Character Area good connections with surrounding localities and the rest of the city. Taken together the vitality, road links, mix of shops and churches, especially of a larger scale around Boultham Park Road roundabout, and the nearby Boultham Park, partially create a feeling of a neighbourhood centre although there is no public square or urban public space. There is heavy traffic along the main roads which leads to high noise levels and some difficulties for pedestrians.
  • Historical Development
    The current character is strongly influenced by housing development during the Inter-War Period [1919-1945]. With the exception of Skellingthorpe Road and Rookery Lane the streets in the Character Area were laid out in the 1920s and the earliest buildings in the current townscape date from this time. Bell Grove, Moorland Avenue and Roydon Grove had their layouts proposed in 1924 by Naylor, Sale and Woore of Derby and were built in 1925. The construction of St. Helen’s Avenue was proposed by Mrs E Blank, builder, in April 1929. The majority of the housing was built between the 1920s and 1938 with the remainder complete by 1950.
     Two-storey semi-detached houses in red brick on Rookery Lane. The properties have front gardens with a low wall separating them from the pavement.
    Figure 1 Most of the buildings in Skellingthorpe are two-storey single-fronted semi-detached houses in red brick. The majority were built between the 1920s and 1938 with the remainder completed by 1950
     
    Although the majority of the current townscape dates from the Inter-War Period there are some earlier elements which influence the townscape character. The earliest element is Skellingthorpe Road, which probably dates from the medieval era. Early maps indicate that it was part of the road from Bracebridge at Newark Road to Skellingthorpe via the medieval settlement of Boultham. It was shown as tree-lined in 1886/9 and has continued to be used as a main thoroughfare. Rookery Lane dates from at least 1800. It was formerly part of the Boultham Hall estate, and once called Boultham Lane and may also have been part of the road from Newark Road to Skellingthorpe. The Boultham Hall estate, now a public park, forms part of the eastern boundary of the Character Area. Boultham Park Road began as the private lane of the Ellison family of Boultham Hall and was reconstructed in 1923. The junction of these three important roads has continued to be a significant feature in the townscape with the later addition of Moorland Avenue which follows part of the line of a footpath on the OS 1886 map leading from Boultham Hall to Whisby Road. St. Helens Avenue follows the line of a track leading to a group of buildings on the same map. The rear plot boundaries of 2-56 Harris Road follow the line of a former field boundary as do the rear plot boundaries of some of the properties on the western side of Roydon Grove and the rear plot boundaries of properties on the south side of Harris Road. The alignment of a track running from fields to the south to Skellingthorpe Road on the 1886 OS map can still be seen as the current footpath between 79 and 81 Skellingthorpe Road.
     
    Skellingthorpe level crossing dates from1888 and was part of the Midland/L M and S Railway which was built in 1846. This crossing was widened after the 1930s and traffic lights and lifting barriers introduced in the 1970s. The bridge carrying Rookery Lane over the Pike Drain was constructed in 1920. The earliest part of the Usher County Junior School was built in 1930 as Skellingthorpe Road Junior School and extended sometime between 1938 and 1950. Holy Cross Church on Skellingthorpe Road was built between 1938 and 1942. Its architect, H T Rushton of London, was the winner of a competition to design the church.
     Holy Cross Church on Skellingthorpe road, which was built between 1938 and 1942, was designed by HT Rushton of London
    Figure 2 Holy Cross Church, built between 1938 and 1942, was designed by HT Rushton of London
    Since 1950 development in the Character Area has mainly consisted of small scale infill. Numbers 151, 153, 155 and 167 Rookery Lane were built between 1950 and 1972 and between 1972 and 2006 George Elsey House on Moorland Avenue was built and two houses at the corner of Skellingthorpe Road and Tritton Road were demolished. An area of infill development also took place at the northern end of St. Helen’s Avenue on the site of a former farm and riding stables. Tritton Road itself was built in the late 1960s to carry the increasing volumes of traffic as suburban development took more people away from the traditional city centre. St. Peter and St. Paul Church was built between 1967 and 1968.
  • Urban form
    Skellingthorpe is a suburban Character Area with mostly residential buildings although there are shops, churches and a school around Boultham Park Road roundabout and along Skellingthorpe Road.
     
    The southern boundary of the Character Area is formed by the rear plot boundaries of 155 to 169 Rookery Lane, 2 to 56 Harris Road, 61 Moorland Avenue, the southern plot boundary of 72 Moorland Avenue, rear plot boundaries of 48 to 72 Moorland Avenue, the rear plot boundaries of 19 to 34 Roydon Grove, and the rear plot boundaries of 55 to 113 Skellingthorpe Road. The western boundary is formed by the railway line, the rear plot boundary of the allotment gardens and Tritton Road. The northern boundary is formed by the rear plot boundary of the open ground to the north of Usher County Junior School, the rear plot boundary of 51 St. Helens Avenue and Paddock House, the rear plot boundaries of 2 to 42 St. Helens Avenue and 16 to 58 Skellingthorpe Road. The eastern boundary is formed by Rookery Lane, the rear plot boundaries of 162 to 232 Rookery Lane, 277 to 283 Boultham Park Road and Boultham Park Road.
     
    The large blocks with very limited pedestrian permeability contribute to the predominantly suburban character with all buildings with gardens facing out on to the street and set back by an average of over 5m. There is a low sense of enclosure along Moorland Avenue with its wide carriageway, verge and footpath and deeper setbacks although there is a fairly continuous building line. Elsewhere in the Character Area there is a stronger sense of enclosure for a suburb from the narrower streets and relatively continuous building lines. Public/private boundaries are mainly low hedges, walls and fences in varying designs although in some places the buildings façades themselves form the boundary. There are mainly active frontages except along Tritton Road where there are no building frontages. St. Peter and St. Paul Church and Holy Cross Church are landmark buildings with distinctive architectural styles and a larger building scale than the rest of the Character Area. St. Peter and St. Paul terminates views along Rookery Lane and, to some extent, Moorland Avenue. The bell tower of Holy Cross Church also stands out in the skyline.
     
    Most of the buildings in Skellingthorpe are two-storey single-fronted semi-detached houses in red brick. Roofs are hipped with a fairly steep pitch and tall brick chimneys in the centre. Many houses have bay windows at ground-floor level, some of which have the same style of wooden cornices as those on houses of the Late Victorian/Edwardian Period elsewhere in Lincoln. Some houses have gabled dormers with windows below eaves. The Arts and Crafts style and Garden City movement influence on houses with hipped roofs with deep eaves, tall chimneys and bay windows can also be seen in the neighbouring Moorland Character Area. There are some detached houses which are very similar in style although they tend to have a double front and harled first floor with exposed brickwork detailing. There is a three-storey apartment block at the junction of Moorland Avenue and Rookery Lane in red brick with a plain façade, gabled roof with varying pitch, brown concrete tiles, no chimney and flush eaves with white bargeboards. There are also several small-scale commercial buildings around Boultham Park Road roundabout. These are mostly in the same architectural style as the semi-detached housing in the Character Area but with modern shop fronts at ground-floor level and no setback from the footway. The one exception is the Co-op building, which has horizontal wooden and vertical concrete panels on the façade, large expanses of blank wall, a curved slate roof and large industrial-style extraction chimneys.
     Three-storey apartment block at the junction of Moorland Avenue and Rookery Lane which is the tallest residential development in the Character Area. It is constructed in red brick with a plain fa├žade, gabled roof with varying pitch, brown concrete tiles.
    Figure 3 Three-storey apartment block at the junction of Moorland Avenue and Rookery Lane which is the tallest residential development in the Character Area. It is constructed in red brick with a plain façade, gabled roof with varying pitch, brown concrete tiles
     
    The three churches in the Character Area are of varying architectural styles. Holy Cross Church has a large steeply pitched gabled roof and bell tower to the south west. There are three dormer windows and detailing on the red-brick façade is picked out in yellow brick. It has large, stone mullioned windows with a semi-circular head in the east and west facades. Moorland Park Methodist Church is a yellow brick building with large vertical windows immediately below the overhanging eaves and some other windows of varying sizes at ground-floor level. There is a horizontal band of light yellow render along the middle of the façade and red tile sills. The roof is gabled with a shallow pitch and brown concrete tiles. St. Peter and St. Paul Church is of brown brick with white concrete panels. Its angled walls face in various directions while the entrance has a large porch with stone panels, varied window size and shape and a large statue above the door. There are large vertical stained-glass windows on all walls with projecting concrete mullions.
     Peter and St. Paul Church which is constructed in brown brick with white concrete panels. Its angled walls face in various directions and there are large vertical stained-glass windows on all walls with projecting concrete mullions
    Figure 4 St. Peter and St. Paul Church which is constructed in brown brick with white concrete panels. Its angled walls face in various directions and there are large vertical stained-glass windows on all walls with projecting concrete mullions
     
    The housing density is relatively low and there is a suburban grain with a plot width of around 7-9 metres, sometimes double plots of around 15m, and a residential building width of 5-6m on average.
     
    The topography of the Character Area is flat with relatively straight streets in a geometric pattern. Most houses have large gardens, some of them with mature trees. Some front gardens have been covered with tarmac or gravel to allow car parking. There are grass verges along some streets. Both schools have large playing fields to the rear; however, these spaces are not publicly accessible. There is pedestrian access to Boultham Park from the Character Area. Part of the main vehicle traffic network in south Lincoln runs through the Character Area with one trunk road (Tritton Road) as well as four main roads (Skellingthorpe Road, Rookery Lane, Moorland Avenue and Boultham Park Road) which meet at a roundabout. The remainder of the Character Area consists of residential streets and cul-de-sacs. Footways are of tarmac or concrete flags while carriageways are tarmac with concrete kerbs. There are a lot of telegraph poles with wires fanning across the streets. There is heavy traffic along the main roads and a lot of pedestrian activity along the main roads and around the schools. The level crossing on Skellingthorpe Road affects the flow of traffic, and the heavy traffic and lack of crossing places can restrict pedestrian movement, particularly at Boultham Park Road roundabout.
     
    Taken together the vitality and road links focusing on Boultham Park Road roundabout, mix of shops and churches, especially of a larger scale around the roundabout, and the nearby Boultham Park, partially create a feeling of a neighbourhood centre although there is no public square or urban public space.
  • Views
    There are limited views into or out of the Character Area. There are terminating views of St. Peter and St. Paul from Moorland Avenue and Rookery Lane.
  • Condition of Buildings and Streetscape
    The buildings are generally in good condition; however, some of the footway and carriageway surfaces are in poor condition. Nearly all the windows are uPVC replacements and most of the doors have been replaced.
  • Use
    Skellingthorpe Character Area is mainly residential with some commercial and civic buildings centred around the Boultham Park Road roundabout in the north east of the Character Area and along Skellingthorpe Road.
  • Relationship to City and Surrounding Areas
    Skellingthorpe Character Area is a suburban development about 2.5km to the south of the city centre. It contains the interchange between four main roads – Skellingthorpe Road, Rookery Lane, Moorland Avenue and Boultham Park Road and therefore has good road links to the rest of the city and also good links to neighbouring areas. It provides, in part, a neighbourhood centre for surrounding localities.
  • Key Townscape Characteristics
    ·           A suburban mainly residential Character Area with some commercial and civic uses (school, churches and shops) on Skellingthorpe Road and at Boultham Park Road roundabout
    ·          Part of main vehicle traffic network in south Lincoln with one trunk road to the west and four main roads within the Character Area. The rest of Character Area consists of residential streets and cul-de-sacs.
    ·          Area of vitality at shops around Boultham Park Road roundabout
    ·          Larger-scale church, shops and apartment block facing each other on Boultham Park Road roundabout
    ·          The above characteristics partially create a feeling of a neighbourhood centre although there is no public square or urban public space
    ·          Majority of current townscape dates from Inter-War Period [1919-1945]
    ·          Earlier medieval (the alignment of Skellingthorpe Road) and 19th-century (such as the alignment of Rookery Lane and St. Helen’s Avenue, and Skellingthorpe level crossing) landscape and townscape elements still influence the character
    ·          Large blocks with very limited pedestrian permeability
    ·          Low sense of enclosure along Moorland Avenue with wide streets and deep setbacks although fairly continuous building line
    ·          Elsewhere stronger sense of enclosure for a suburb from narrower streets
    ·          Two-storey buildings, semi-detached houses, mainly in red brick
    ·          Mainly semi-detached houses, some detached and one apartment block
    ·          Arts and Crafts style influence on houses – hipped roofs with deep eaves, tall chimneys and bay windows, can also be seen in neighbouring Moorland Character Area
    ·          Heavy traffic along main roads
    ·          Lot of pedestrian activity along main roads and around schools
    ·          Good links to surrounding localities and rest of city – intersection of 4 main roads at Boultham Park Road Roundabout
    ·          Landmark buildings – St. Peter and St. Paul Church and Holy Cross Church