St. Matthew's

Description

Use the open/close headers to view different sections of the Character Area Statement. for the area you are in. A full copy of the statement can be downlaoded from the 'Documents'  section of each Character Area.

  • Overview
    The townscape of St Matthews Character Area is laid out along the simple intersection of two main roads with many cul-de-sacs leading off them. Although there are good vehicle connections to north and south via Boultham Park Road and east and west via Dixon Street, the Character Area mainly consists of separate areas of residential developments, within a Character Area that is itself surrounded by industrial areas and ‘out-of-town’ retail parks to north, west and east. In addition, the large impermeable urban blocks within the Character Area, the boundary to the east formed by the Witham, and areas of very different townscape make the Character Area difficult to get around on foot or to access from some parts of the city. Furthermore, these factors create a Character Area that does not have a coherent form or centre and does not have a clear, distinct character. This is in part due to the varied suburban townscape reflecting changes from early 19th century through to the 21st century, many of which have been carried out with limited reference to earlier developments.
     
    The townscape comprises a number of different periods of housing development from Late Victorian/Edwardian [1868-1918] through to Modern [1967-2009] in a variety of very different styles reflecting changing requirements and tastes. Buildings are one to two storeys in height and mainly semi-detached houses and terraces with active frontages. Earlier developments are terraced houses along Coulson Road and Waterloo Street followed by ribbon development along Boultham Park Road. Later developments tend to be self-contained residential cul-de-sacs facing inwards. St Matthews Church is a landmark building. It was a ‘tin tabernacle’ built to serve residents of the new suburb in 1912.
     
    The Character Area is surrounded to the north, east and west by industrial areas and ‘out of town’ retail parks. It is difficult to move around the Character Area or to access it from some parts of the city due to the large impermeable blocks formed by the River Witham and the areas of very different townscape. Although there are good vehicle connections to the south via Boultham Park Road and east and west via Dixon Street, pedestrian connections are also limited to those roads. There is traffic noise from Boultham Park Road and Tritton Road but away from these roads the Character Area is quiet with little or no through traffic.
  • Historical Development
    The current character of St Matthews has been influenced by many developments from the 19th century onwards. In the early years of the 19th century the Ellison family’s private drive to Boultham Hall ran through this Character Area across enclosed fields and the Catchwater Drain. The arrival of the railway in the 1880s preceded the building of terraced housing in the north of the Character Area and later semi-detached housing further south, initially concentrated along Boultham Park Road. Housing in the Character Area continued to expand gradually with small pockets of infill development during the mid 20th century before the removal of the railway in 1985 paved the way for some quite large areas of infill development.
     
    The part of the River Witham in this Character Area is known as the upper Witham and it flows into Brayford Pool and then on to the east where as the lower Witham it was canalised and formed the basis of an important trading network. The upper Witham would mainly have been used for local transport, pleasure boating and bathing from the 19th century until around the mid 20th century. In the 1940s there was a boathouse on the riverbank immediately to the east of Marjorie Avenue.
     
    Some field boundaries dating back to before 1886 are still visible in the current townscape. For example, the rear plot boundaries of 9 to 27 Glenwood Grove follow the line of a field boundary and footpath on the 1886 OS map, and all properties along Marjorie Avenue are contained within the area of a field shown on 1886 map.
     
    The Main Drain was cut as part of the Lincoln West Drainage Scheme in 1804-16 mainly to drain land for cultivation. Boultham Park Road was a private drive from High Street to Boultham Hall until the 1920s when it was rebuilt and became a public road. The section of railway embankment to the south of Coulson Road was part of the Great Northern and Great Eastern Joint Railway Avoiding Line built in 1882 to carry goods traffic away from the GNR station and level crossings. It ran on an embankment from Washingborough Junction to Pyewipe and was removed in 1985. The terraced houses along what remains of Waterloo Street were built sometime between the street being laid out in 1884 and 1907 and are the oldest buildings in the Character Area. It is the only survivor from a group of streets built to accommodate workers in the New Boultham factories. St. Matthews Church on Boultham Park Road was created as a chapel of St. Helen’s Boultham in 1912 to cater for the residents of the new suburbs built to accommodate workers at the Wellington Works and other industries in New Boultham and Skewbridge. The building is a pre-fabricated ‘tin tabernacle’ and was extended in 1924.
     
    Coulson Road is a continuation of Boultham Avenue. Its construction was proposed by Lincoln Cooperative Society in 1911 and the terraced houses were probably built soon after – they were completed by 1938. The eastern section from Boultham Park Road to the road bridge was widened in 1920.
     Coulson Road is a continuation of Boultham Avenue. Its construction was proposed by Lincoln Cooperative Society in 1911 and the terraced houses were probably built soon after – they were completed by 1938
    Figure 1 Coulson Road is a continuation of Boultham Avenue. Its construction was proposed by Lincoln Cooperative Society in 1911 and the terraced houses were probably built soon after – they were completed by 1938
     
    Marjorie Avenue was laid out between 1913 and 1919 but only as far east as numbers 7 and 8. After 1970 it was extended eastwards. Church Drive was also laid out some time between 1913 and 1919. The Victory Pub on Boultham Park Road was built in 1919 to commemorate the end of World War One and the war memorial on Boultham Park Road was erected in 1920. By 1938 Church Drive and some housing along Boultham Park Road had also been built. 
     The Victory Pub on Boultham Park Road was built in 1919 to commemorate the end of World War One. The building is painted white with some details being highlight in black paint.
    Figure 2 The Victory Pub on Boultham Park Road was built in 1919 to commemorate the end of World War One and the war memorial on Boultham Park Road was erected in 1920
     
    The rest of the housing in the area was built in small units over time until some fairly large-scale infill development which has taken place since 1990 and includes Earls Drive, Peppercorn Close, Gresley Drive, St. Matthews Close, Railway Park Drive and Marjorie Avenue.
  • Urban form
    St Matthews is a mainly residential suburban Character Area close to the city centre on flat land. There is an intersection of two main roads, Dixon Street and Boultham Park Road, although north of Dixon Street, Boultham Park Road is a secondary mixed-use street while the rest of the Character Area is made up of residential streets and cul-de-sacs. Boultham Park Road is a wide street with wide footways of around 3 metres and deep front gardens. The topography of the Character Area is flat with a mostly linear street pattern although there are some sinuous cul-de-sacs.
     Terraced houses on Church Drive, which each have bay windows on the ground floor. The street is lined by trees either side.
    Figure 3 The topography of the Character Area is flat with a mostly linear street pattern, as in the case of Church Drive, although there are some sinuous cul-de-sacs
     
    The sense of enclosure varies throughout the Character Area; in some places such as Church Drive and Coulson Road there is a good suburban sense of enclosure from the continuous building line and near-continuous public/private boundary; however, elsewhere there is a lack of enclosure resulting from a varied building line. The urban block structure consists mostly of large and impermeable blocks that limit pedestrian and vehicle movement. There are active frontages throughout most of the Character Area as all buildings face on to the street and have regularly spaced doors and windows. Although the shops and pub along Boultham Park Road are the focus for some activity there is no obvious centre to the Character Area. Overall the townscape has a medium density and grain.
     
    Buildings in St Matthews are a mix of detached and semi-detached houses, small rows of houses and terraces. Most buildings are two storeys high although there are some bungalows. No particular architectural style dominates; this reflects the development of the Character Area as a series of small-scale housing developments over a period of over a hundred years. All buildings face on to the street but only those on Coulson Road and Waterloo Street face out of the Character Area. Throughout the rest of the Character Area buildings tend to face inwards even when they back on to open fields. St Matthews Church and the Victory pub stand out as landmark buildings within the Character Area. The former Co-op building on the corner of Coulson Road and Boultham Park Road that is now in residential use stands out as a corner building. There are strong rhythms of repeated building form and detail along the streets of terraced houses; however, building rhythms are less pronounced or non-existent throughout the rest of the Character Area.
     Semi-detached properties on Glenwood Grove. The properties have pay windows on the ground and first floor in the middle part of the property, which juts out slightly.
    Figure 4 Semi-detached properties on Glenwood Grove. The transition from the tight urban form of the Late Victorian/Edwardian terraces to the more suburban forms of the 20th century is a strong characteristic
     
    The transition from the tight urban form of the Late Victorian/Edwardian terraces to the more suburban forms of the 20th century is a strong characteristic of St Matthews Character Area. Housing varies from the back of footway terraces of Coulson Road and Waterloo Street through the semi-detached houses and rows of houses along and leading off Boultham Park Road, with their small front gardens, to the detached and semi-detached late 20th-century houses set in large gardens and built along the cul-de-sacs. There is some continuity in terms of building materials with many houses built of red brick and many with harled upper storeys. Most houses are single-fronted and many have ground-floor bay windows; a few detached houses have two-storey bay windows. Houses dating from the Late Victorian/Edwardian and Inter-War Periods tend to have heavy plain or moulded lintels above doors and windows, moulded brickwork below the eaves and decorative wooden cornices on bay windows. Later houses have a variety of decorative detailing including half-timbered-style decoration and wooden bargeboards and finials. Roofs are hipped or gabled with slate or pantile covering and varied eaves depth while chimneys vary from tall brick to none.
     Late 20th-century houses on Gresley Drive, these properties have a variety of decoration in the form of wooden bargeboards and brick stringcourses.
    Figure 5 Late 20th-century houses are detached or semi-detached and are built along cul-de-sacs. They have a variety of decorative detailing including wooden bargeboards and brick string courses
     
    Although the only open spaces in the Character Area are along the banks of the Witham and the Main Drain, there are mature trees along Boultham Park Road, Church Drive and grass verges along some streets which emphasise the suburban character of the Character Area. Roads and footways are of tarmac with concrete kerbs and drainage channels, and are generally in good condition. The Character Area is quiet away from Boultham Park Road with the large number of cul-de-sacs resulting in low levels of vehicular and pedestrian through-traffic.
  • Views
    There are some glimpses of the Cathedral from the southern part of Boultham Park Road and views of the former Rustons building from Coulson Road. There are views of the Cathedral from Waterloo Street.
     View of Lincoln Cathedral from Waterloo Street.
    Figure 6 There are views of the Cathedral from several places, including the junction of Coulson Road and Tritton Road. This, combined with its location close to large retail parks off Tritton Road, highlights the area’s proximity to the city centre
  • Condition of Buildings and Streetscape
    The buildings and streetscape are in generally good condition although there are large numbers of replacement roofs, windows and doors out of keeping with the style of the buildings.
  • Use
    The Character Area is primarily residential with some local shops and a church.
  • Relationship to City and Surrounding Areas
    Although there are good road links with the rest of the city via Boultham Park Road and Dixon Street it is difficult to move around the Character Area on foot or obtain access from some parts of city due to the large, impermeable urban blocks, the boundary formed by Witham and areas of very different townscape within the Character Area. Much of the later housing development within the Character Area is in the form of cul-de-sacs of inward-facing housing with little or no link to the surrounding townscape.
  • Key Townscape Characteristics
    ·          Character area does not have coherent form or centre
    ·          Lack of clear, distinct character although there is a great variety of building style
    ·          Boultham Park Road originally private drive from High Street to Boultham Hall, some 19th-century trees survive
    ·          Different periods of housing development from Late Victorian/Edwardian to Modern in very different styles reflecting changing requirements and tastes
    ·          Later developments tend to be self-contained residential cul-de-sacs facing inwards
    ·          Series of separate areas of residential developments along Boultham Park Road and Coulson Road with some shops and a church
    ·          St Matthews Church landmark building – ‘tin tabernacle’ built to serve residents of new suburb
    ·          Character area surrounded by industrial areas and ‘out of town’ retail parks to north, west and east
    ·          Difficult to move around the Character Area on foot or access from some parts of city due to large, impermeable urban blocks, formed by Witham and areas of very different townscape
    ·          Good vehicle connections south via Boultham Park Road and east and west via Dixon Street
    ·          Pedestrian connections limited to roads to north, west and east
    ·          Mainly simple intersection of two main roads with many cul-de-sacs leading off them with varied layouts
    ·          One to two storey buildings, mainly semi-detached and terraces
    ·          Active frontages throughout area
    ·          Traffic noise from Boultham Park Road and Tritton Road but quiet elsewhere